Yes —I’m planning another to talk about some of the tradeoffs a little more clearly at liberal arts school.

Quickly: Two more factors in finding a good fit are the accessibility of research to undergrads as well as the resources needed for research. Someone determined to teach at a liberal arts school might need to pivot their research (that’s what I did). Not all research is a good fit for smaller schools.

But it’s also worth mentioning that the resources and facilities of the top 30–50 liberal arts schools often surprise my colleagues at larger universities. Here at Bucknell, we actually have a group of biomedical engineering faculty who continue to be very active in research (a recent example: https://www.bucknell.edu/news-and-media/2016/april/bucknell-professor-jim-baish-79-will-share-in-29-million-nih-grant.htm). It’s doable, but you’re right that it’s probably less common.

I’ll try not to let this comment run away from me, but even in resource-intensive research fields, university positions can’t be simply pushed to the edges in teaching vs. research. But time and time again, that’s what I hear from graduate students! The distribution of jobs in that middle space are different between disciplines (probably less in biomedical), but they are there. Ignoring them is a great disservice to graduate students who are making complex decisions about the next stage of their lives.

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Bucknell Computer Science Faculty. Trying to make your computer fit you better. HCI, data visualization. my site: eg.bucknell.edu/~emp017/

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